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March 07 2018

toyindustrynews
7744 c946 125
Anyone that is ready for a promising and interesting career should look at the toy industry for inspiration. This is a global market that continues to grow each year and has a variety of opportunities available. Nearly anyone would find something interesting to them and within their range of experience and skills. Here are some of the personality types who would thrive most in this industry.

The Creative Thinker

Creativity sets one toy company apart from the next. Every top toy recruiter wants to find energetic and passionate candidates with new and unique ideas. The ability to see upcoming trends and find ways to personalize them to the company is something that will help a toy employee stand out from the competition.

The Versatile Employee

Toy companies come in all sizes, and the employees of smaller companies are often required to handle more than one task. The versatile worker that is happy learning new skills will excel in these smaller companies. Versatility is also needed for many employees working for larger toy companies because they often have locations around the United States and in other countries. Flexibility about job titles and work locations makes promotions much more likely.

The Globally Minded

One of the most notable things about any toy industry news is how it is not regional. The toy industry is something that covers nearly every country in the world. Thanks to the Internet, a trend is no longer something that happens in one state or one country. Children around the world can go crazy for a specific item at the same time. Good toy workers are those that do not let language barriers, ethnicity, or religious differences prevent them from developing ideas that appeal to girls and boys everywhere.

The toy industry is a dynamic place that offers opportunities for people seeking to get some work experience, especially for those that are ready for a mid-career change and for experienced executives that want to use their decades of talent in a new way. It is worth the effort to talk to a recruiter and to learn more about the skills and experience hiring managers are currently seeking.

Don't be the product, buy the product!

Schweinderl